krakosianczar asked:

The Church of England just decided to start ordaining women as bishops. I think it's a big step in the right direction for the Church of England.

Well of course, if it is deemed right to allow women to be ordained priests then it is stupid to withhold them from the episcopacy.

Anonymous asked:

Which are the most impressive churches in Hampshire liturgically speaking?

Probably S. Michael’s Abbey, Farnborough or S. Agatha’s, Landport. Both are RC and are very much ‘Reform of the Reform’ places.

As to Anglican churches, there are plenty of Anglo-Catholic churches but I imagine the majority have only reasonably good liturgy if you want a shrine church you’ll have to go to London or Brighton.

dick-of-saint-vick

jepartrick asked:

There are those that are trying to get an eastern rite into the Anglican Communion. easternanglicanism <dot> org

kit-power answered:

this is so cool. I really like that. (and also @dadreversal420 said something about this eastern Anglican rite too)

can someone, though, explain to me episcopalian vs anglican? it used to be that I thought episco = American, Anglican = English, but I’ve since gotten a different understand but it’s very fuzzy and probably not accurate. now I’m kind of like episco = kinda liberal kinda progressive?? Anglican = ???? maybe just more conservative???

someone explain?

dick-of-saint-vick:

"Anglican" as a label is kind of a neologism; IIRC it only started really taking off in the 1840s (and, later on, during British decolonization, when a lot of the CoE’s provinces became autocephalous.)

"Episcopalian" actually predates it by at least a century.

As to an eastern rite within Anglicanism, as much as it seems a good idea I don’t believe it is what we should be doing. It has always been the strength of Anglicanism that we have a common rite centred on the Book of Common Prayer in it’s original form of 1662. Although different parts of the Communion have made variations to this order they share more common ground than differences.

The aim of infusing Anglican liturgy and spirituality with ideas, and aesthetics from Orthodox sources is a noble idea and was already attempted by the Caroline Divines in the 17th century to show Anglicanism as Catholic but not Roman.

dick-of-saint-vick

jepartrick asked:

There are those that are trying to get an eastern rite into the Anglican Communion. easternanglicanism <dot> org

kit-power answered:

this is so cool. I really like that. (and also @dadreversal420 said something about this eastern Anglican rite too)

can someone, though, explain to me episcopalian vs anglican? it used to be that I thought episco = American, Anglican = English, but I’ve since gotten a different understand but it’s very fuzzy and probably not accurate. now I’m kind of like episco = kinda liberal kinda progressive?? Anglican = ???? maybe just more conservative???

someone explain?

Episcopalian would usually refer to non-English/Welsh members of the Anglican Communion or those who are not connected to the British sovereign in any official way, e.g the Anglican Church of Canada, Canada being a member of the Commonwealth, and the Episcopal Church in America where the President is head of the United States.

Of course American Episcopalians are more liberal than the English Anglicans and because of this the continuing churches in America tend to label themselves as Anglican to differentiate from the Episcopalians

sodomyandunpleasantaccents
sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

This undated photograph (1920s?) shows the Magdalen College (Oxford) Mission (founded 1884), which sought to benefit first the urban poor of Stepney, then after 1908 Somers Town (Euston), in particular with St. Mary’s Church there.  According to the College, its best-known Missioner was Fr Basil Jellicoe (1899-1935)  in the 1920s.  Fr. Jellicoe may be the priest without a biretta, fifth adult from the left.  This is an example of Anglo-Catholic social outreach in the interwar decades.
The priest you mention, fifth adult from the left without a biretta, is in fact Fr. Jellicoe. Thank you for the submission. 

sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

This undated photograph (1920s?) shows the Magdalen College (Oxford) Mission (founded 1884), which sought to benefit first the urban poor of Stepney, then after 1908 Somers Town (Euston), in particular with St. Mary’s Church there.  According to the College, its best-known Missioner was Fr Basil Jellicoe (1899-1935)  in the 1920s.  Fr. Jellicoe may be the priest without a biretta, fifth adult from the left.  This is an example of Anglo-Catholic social outreach in the interwar decades.

The priest you mention, fifth adult from the left without a biretta, is in fact Fr. Jellicoe. Thank you for the submission. 

Anonymous asked:

It seems to me that any time the Spirit acts to make a change in the world or the Church, the majority of "Catholic Christians," and in fact many of those who have taken comfort in the status quo reject Christ's call to build up the Kingdom.

But if God really wants women priests would he not send the Holy Spirit to inspire all the church’s leaders to ordain women.

I’m not saying that women shouldn’t be ordained, nor that I would not like it, but surely God would inspire the majority of churches to do it if he wanted it.

Also what about in the Church of England’s synod where they voted, with the the guidance of the Holy Spirit, on women Bishops and the got a No. So then they ask the Holy Spirit to reconsider it’s decision when they vote again?