voraciousexpectations

awgusteen:

Choosing a denomination is more than agreeing with their theology.It’s not just choosing a denomination because you align with their teachings. You choose a church, not just for the theology, but for the people and the culture surrounding them.

Denominations come with cultural…

This is why I don’t think I could ever become a Roman Catholic or Orthodox Christian. Us Anglo-Catholics have such a wonderful culture.

ohzeitgeist
Somehow Christianity has become a nonmystical religion. It’s about a reasonable faith. If we believe the right things, then we are orthodox. Frankly whether we ever actually connect to God or experience His undeniable presence has become incidental, if not irrelevant. We have become believers rather than experiencers. To know God in the Scriptures always went beyond information to intimacy. We may find ourselves uncomfortable with this reality, but the faith of the Scriptures is a mystical faith. It leads us beyond the material world into an invisible reality.
Erwin McManus, The Barbarian Way (via contrariansoul)

looseupperlip asked:

Thanks for answering my question! Could I clarify? The "organic development of liturgy" refers to the evolution of the Mass over the past 2000 years. Now the important thing is that these things came about through tradition--change came in baby steps over hundreds of years. This is thought to be the best way to develop liturgy because it respects tradition. Does the BCP respect that tradition? It seems to me Cranmer made a totally new Canon and the formation of the BCP was not organic at all.

No, the BCP does not respect the tradition of an unchanging liturgy, but then it is a primarily Protestant document, however if you look at what the more Catholic divines of the early Anglican Church thought in regards to liturgy and how they practiced it one sees far greater continuity.

The Prayerbook of 1549 was really not much different from the Mass which preceded it and can be seen as a direct continuance of what went before. The prayers were the same but only rendered in English. Of courses many members of the Church of England, all throughout it’s history have advocated a return to this Prayerbook.

So, of course the Prayerbook as we know it flaunts the idea that the Liturgy should never change but then so much of the Roman rite does as well. The various Liturgies that have existed can hardly claim to be the same as the New Rite as much as the BCP can claim to be a continuance of the Rite of Sarum.

looseupperlip asked:

Do you believe in the organic development of the liturgy? That is, that liturgy must be the gradual accumulation of tradition over centuries rather than the result of innovation? If so, how is Cranmer's writing of the BCP organic? If not, why not?

I don’t think I really do believe in organic development of the Liturgies. I really think that once the liturgy was formulated then it should remain as it did, of course the calendars can be added to and the aesthetics of ornaments of the Liturgy can change with fashion. However I don’t think that the liturgy should change with the times unless it is felt that revision (and revision should only be very slight) is need for the betterment of the Church. 

Just as the Doctrine of the Church never changes so the Liturgy does not because if the Liturgy does remain the same then it provides a link with our ancestors in faith stronger than anything else the Church can provide. 

varangoi
jcassian:

'The dogmas of the fathers are despised; apostolical traditions are set at nought; the discoveries of innovators hold sway in the Churches. Men have learned to be speculatists instead of theologians. The wisdom of the world has the place of honour, having dispossed the glorying in the Cross. The pastors are driven away, grievous wolves are brought in instead, and plunder the flock of Christ. Houses of prayer are destitute of preachers; the deserts are full of mourners: the aged sorrow, comparing what is with what was; more pitiable the young, as not knowing what they are deprived of.What has been said is sufficient to kindle the sympathy of those who are taught in the love of Christ, yet, compared with the facts, it is far from reaching their gravity.’St. Basil the Great

jcassian:

'The dogmas of the fathers are despised; apostolical traditions are set at nought; the discoveries of innovators hold sway in the Churches. Men have learned to be speculatists instead of theologians. The wisdom of the world has the place of honour, having dispossed the glorying in the Cross. The pastors are driven away, grievous wolves are brought in instead, and plunder the flock of Christ. Houses of prayer are destitute of preachers; the deserts are full of mourners: the aged sorrow, comparing what is with what was; more pitiable the young, as not knowing what they are deprived of.

What has been said is sufficient to kindle the sympathy of those who are taught in the love of Christ, yet, compared with the facts, it is far from reaching their gravity.’

St. Basil the Great